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Democrats Desperately Begin Senate Debate on Electoral Reform | international

Demonstrators in front of the Senate to demand the adoption of electoral reform.Leah Meles (Reuters)

Desperately, with mounting criticism from civil rights groups and violent obstruction of two members within the same party, Democratic senators in the United States Congress are beginning the now eternal debate on electoral reform, which they know is mortally wounded. This will be the fifth time the Senate has attempted to approve regulations regarding the right to vote during this Congress, which began nearly a year ago with Joe Biden’s arrival in the White House.

The efforts of the Senate Majority Leader, Chuck Schumer, don’t matter much when it comes to juggling to circumvent the iron blockage that imposes A qualified majority three-fifths to pass a standard. It doesn’t matter much to them because whether it’s Schumer, the grandchildren of Martin Luther King, or the president of the nation himself who advocates the protection and protection of democracy with an electoral law that does not exclude minorities, there are two members within the Democratic Party who are crushing. Any attempt to approach a simple majority vote.

Kirsten Senema and Joe Manchin are the guarantors of the failure of electoral reform. two Main splits Which hurt even more than the strong Republican opposition, as not even one of the fifty senators moved vigorously to defend a single act. The foregoing is undoubtedly a logical consequence of the fact that in 2021, 19 states approved by a Republican majority 34 laws restricting suffrage.

For Martin Luther King III, son of the civil rights leader of the same name, Cinema and Mansion represented those white moderates to whom his father addressed in sermons in the 1950s and 1960s, who identified themselves for blacks and had guarantees to vote, but then could not Take action to claim them.

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“History will not treat them kindly,” the descendant of the pastor who was murdered in Memphis in 1968 said of Cinema and Mansion. However, Sinema, via her Twitter account, celebrated the memory of Martin Luther King Day, which was celebrated in the United States last Monday. “Today we remember the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King,” he said. Strictly speaking, a senator from Arizona has nothing to object to the voting law. What Sinema opposes is ignoring, changing or compromising the parliamentary tactic of stalling. Sinema wants the laws approved by 60 votes.

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She and Manchin want at least 10 Republican senators to join the bill and embrace the bipartisan partnership. They also warn that if a qualified majority is defeated now, nothing will prevent Republicans from doing the same when they are in power, which could happen next November in the midterm elections. Biden himself, who spent 36 years in the Senate, has been a staunch advocate of stalling. Until now. This is a defining moment, the president declared in a major speech last week in Atlanta, calling the vote “a A milestone for an American democracy in crisis.

The controversial bill would expand access to voting in a country that, after Donald Trump’s passage through the White House, has seen a rollback of minority rights. The reform would restore key provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, legislation made possible by the mobilization of Luther King and then-President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1965. The House passed the bill last week with Democratic support only, and it now faces the huge – and nearly impossible – challenge to pass it in Senate.

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On Wednesday or Thursday, Republicans are supposed to block approval of the legislation, arguing that the regulation responds to partisan interests in controlling the election.

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